Brick Mower - Under the Sink [Viking on Campus; 2011]

Music can spawn a lifetime of deep reflection, often based on a few simple chords and the ability to wrap a melody around your brain like an extra layer of skull. Often it’s the most basic of music that sticks in cerebral wrinkles, firing along with neurons when the appropriate moment arises.
It’s this primal callback that infects much of Brick Mower’s latest LP, Under the Sink. As the title suggests, the album (released via Viking on Campus) is as blue collar as it implies—the New Jersey trio is workmanlike in their blend of power pop and post-punk. Pipes are dislodged, crud eradicated with hammering drums and snaking riffs in the matter of minutes; eleven songs in under 30 minutes—if only plumbers could work as efficiently.
Under the Sink may recall a bevy of 80s and 90s bands that carved the college, indie, and punk circuit but don’t let the nostalgia trip you up. Brick Mower isn’t a cheap imitation; in fact the band’s not an imitation at all. This isn’t some Warholian pop art replica, this is a band willing to roll up their sleeves and pound on their instruments until quality (if brief) anthems of everyday life form. Brick Mower celebrates life as it is, not as it is dreamed to be. Songs such as “Instant Rectification” and “Lungs Can’t Handle” speak to the ho-hum of daily living, a theme revisited throughout Under the Sink to great effect.
Enjoying the art of music is a luxury. Brick Mower, however, pour the foundation for such highbrow approaches. A two-minute statement here, a three-minute exposition there, Under the Sink keeps the pipes freely flowing and the mind sharp. Leave the deeper moments in the clouds for a day and find yourself in Brick Mower’s world—you’ll find that Under the Sinkbecomes your new life line when life beacons.

Brick Mower - Under the Sink [Viking on Campus; 2011]

Music can spawn a lifetime of deep reflection, often based on a few simple chords and the ability to wrap a melody around your brain like an extra layer of skull. Often it’s the most basic of music that sticks in cerebral wrinkles, firing along with neurons when the appropriate moment arises.

It’s this primal callback that infects much of Brick Mower’s latest LP, Under the Sink. As the title suggests, the album (released via Viking on Campus) is as blue collar as it implies—the New Jersey trio is workmanlike in their blend of power pop and post-punk. Pipes are dislodged, crud eradicated with hammering drums and snaking riffs in the matter of minutes; eleven songs in under 30 minutes—if only plumbers could work as efficiently.

Under the Sink may recall a bevy of 80s and 90s bands that carved the college, indie, and punk circuit but don’t let the nostalgia trip you up. Brick Mower isn’t a cheap imitation; in fact the band’s not an imitation at all. This isn’t some Warholian pop art replica, this is a band willing to roll up their sleeves and pound on their instruments until quality (if brief) anthems of everyday life form. Brick Mower celebrates life as it is, not as it is dreamed to be. Songs such as “Instant Rectification” and “Lungs Can’t Handle” speak to the ho-hum of daily living, a theme revisited throughout Under the Sink to great effect.

Enjoying the art of music is a luxury. Brick Mower, however, pour the foundation for such highbrow approaches. A two-minute statement here, a three-minute exposition there, Under the Sink keeps the pipes freely flowing and the mind sharp. Leave the deeper moments in the clouds for a day and find yourself in Brick Mower’s world—you’ll find that Under the Sinkbecomes your new life line when life beacons.

Brick Mower - Under the Sink [Viking on Campus; 2011]

Music can spawn a lifetime of deep reflection, often based on a few simple chords and the ability to wrap a melody around your brain like an extra layer of skull. Often it’s the most basic of music that sticks in cerebral wrinkles, firing along with neurons when the appropriate moment arises.
It’s this primal callback that infects much of Brick Mower’s latest LP, Under the Sink. As the title suggests, the album (released via Viking on Campus) is as blue collar as it implies—the New Jersey trio is workmanlike in their blend of power pop and post-punk. Pipes are dislodged, crud eradicated with hammering drums and snaking riffs in the matter of minutes; eleven songs in under 30 minutes—if only plumbers could work as efficiently.
Under the Sink may recall a bevy of 80s and 90s bands that carved the college, indie, and punk circuit but don’t let the nostalgia trip you up. Brick Mower isn’t a cheap imitation; in fact the band’s not an imitation at all. This isn’t some Warholian pop art replica, this is a band willing to roll up their sleeves and pound on their instruments until quality (if brief) anthems of everyday life form. Brick Mower celebrates life as it is, not as it is dreamed to be. Songs such as “Instant Rectification” and “Lungs Can’t Handle” speak to the ho-hum of daily living, a theme revisited throughout Under the Sink to great effect.
Enjoying the art of music is a luxury. Brick Mower, however, pour the foundation for such highbrow approaches. A two-minute statement here, a three-minute exposition there, Under the Sink keeps the pipes freely flowing and the mind sharp. Leave the deeper moments in the clouds for a day and find yourself in Brick Mower’s world—you’ll find that Under the Sinkbecomes your new life line when life beacons.

Brick Mower - Under the Sink [Viking on Campus; 2011]

Music can spawn a lifetime of deep reflection, often based on a few simple chords and the ability to wrap a melody around your brain like an extra layer of skull. Often it’s the most basic of music that sticks in cerebral wrinkles, firing along with neurons when the appropriate moment arises.

It’s this primal callback that infects much of Brick Mower’s latest LP, Under the Sink. As the title suggests, the album (released via Viking on Campus) is as blue collar as it implies—the New Jersey trio is workmanlike in their blend of power pop and post-punk. Pipes are dislodged, crud eradicated with hammering drums and snaking riffs in the matter of minutes; eleven songs in under 30 minutes—if only plumbers could work as efficiently.

Under the Sink may recall a bevy of 80s and 90s bands that carved the college, indie, and punk circuit but don’t let the nostalgia trip you up. Brick Mower isn’t a cheap imitation; in fact the band’s not an imitation at all. This isn’t some Warholian pop art replica, this is a band willing to roll up their sleeves and pound on their instruments until quality (if brief) anthems of everyday life form. Brick Mower celebrates life as it is, not as it is dreamed to be. Songs such as “Instant Rectification” and “Lungs Can’t Handle” speak to the ho-hum of daily living, a theme revisited throughout Under the Sink to great effect.

Enjoying the art of music is a luxury. Brick Mower, however, pour the foundation for such highbrow approaches. A two-minute statement here, a three-minute exposition there, Under the Sink keeps the pipes freely flowing and the mind sharp. Leave the deeper moments in the clouds for a day and find yourself in Brick Mower’s world—you’ll find that Under the Sinkbecomes your new life line when life beacons.

About:

Justin Spicer is a pop culture critic, writer and editor. He manages Tiny Mix Tapes' Cerberus section. He has written columns for KEXP, Ad Hoc, Impose, and SSG Music. His work has been published by The Village Voice, Brainwashed, and extinct websites and print publications across the globe. This website is a collection of many of Justin's articles, reviews, and features. You can contact him via the links in the side menu or ignore all of this completely.

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