Tilth - Angular Music [Soft Abuse; 2012]
The rolling entrance of Angular Music, the proper debut from Nathan McLaughlin/Cody Yantis duo Tilth, is the fog hovering above the sound, the snow capping Rainier  the Columbia cutting the land in two. It’s the beauty of nature carefully captured in glass. A calculating, spatial composition that feels like the freeze and the thaw—and that’s just the awe of “Godfather.”
The mountain vistas and valley tunes of “For Sean” (a nod to the album’s master and oft mentioned AA fixture, Sean McCann) or the droll revelation of “Drisk” mount a wondrous A-side campaign. Yantis’ fragile guitar work pairs with McLaughlin’s curated sounds to evoke a palette of emotions from a host of similar ideas.
Don’t mistake similar to mean the same. The slow compositions each use a different timbre. “Drisk” is cold and dark, Yantis’ guitar rumbling from the belly of a glacial storm. “First Breath” is minimal nostalgia; though it conjures the childlike remembrance of seeing our breath on the first snow day, it does not out of a need to tap into such emotions to be relevant; it’s just the nature of the tone. “De la Serna” may recall Loren Connor or the simpler moments of the Jeweled Antler Collective but it does not owe either penitence.
Angular Music is the album to balance out the emotions of the day. Its even-keeled approach does not waver even as its disposition does. It is a journey to the center and McLaughlin and Yantis find it; both metaphysically and geographically.

Tilth - Angular Music [Soft Abuse; 2012]

The rolling entrance of Angular Music, the proper debut from Nathan McLaughlin/Cody Yantis duo Tilth, is the fog hovering above the sound, the snow capping Rainier  the Columbia cutting the land in two. It’s the beauty of nature carefully captured in glass. A calculating, spatial composition that feels like the freeze and the thaw—and that’s just the awe of “Godfather.”

The mountain vistas and valley tunes of “For Sean” (a nod to the album’s master and oft mentioned AA fixture, Sean McCann) or the droll revelation of “Drisk” mount a wondrous A-side campaign. Yantis’ fragile guitar work pairs with McLaughlin’s curated sounds to evoke a palette of emotions from a host of similar ideas.

Don’t mistake similar to mean the same. The slow compositions each use a different timbre. “Drisk” is cold and dark, Yantis’ guitar rumbling from the belly of a glacial storm. “First Breath” is minimal nostalgia; though it conjures the childlike remembrance of seeing our breath on the first snow day, it does not out of a need to tap into such emotions to be relevant; it’s just the nature of the tone. “De la Serna” may recall Loren Connor or the simpler moments of the Jeweled Antler Collective but it does not owe either penitence.

Angular Music is the album to balance out the emotions of the day. Its even-keeled approach does not waver even as its disposition does. It is a journey to the center and McLaughlin and Yantis find it; both metaphysically and geographically.

Tilth - Angular Music [Soft Abuse; 2012]
The rolling entrance of Angular Music, the proper debut from Nathan McLaughlin/Cody Yantis duo Tilth, is the fog hovering above the sound, the snow capping Rainier  the Columbia cutting the land in two. It’s the beauty of nature carefully captured in glass. A calculating, spatial composition that feels like the freeze and the thaw—and that’s just the awe of “Godfather.”
The mountain vistas and valley tunes of “For Sean” (a nod to the album’s master and oft mentioned AA fixture, Sean McCann) or the droll revelation of “Drisk” mount a wondrous A-side campaign. Yantis’ fragile guitar work pairs with McLaughlin’s curated sounds to evoke a palette of emotions from a host of similar ideas.
Don’t mistake similar to mean the same. The slow compositions each use a different timbre. “Drisk” is cold and dark, Yantis’ guitar rumbling from the belly of a glacial storm. “First Breath” is minimal nostalgia; though it conjures the childlike remembrance of seeing our breath on the first snow day, it does not out of a need to tap into such emotions to be relevant; it’s just the nature of the tone. “De la Serna” may recall Loren Connor or the simpler moments of the Jeweled Antler Collective but it does not owe either penitence.
Angular Music is the album to balance out the emotions of the day. Its even-keeled approach does not waver even as its disposition does. It is a journey to the center and McLaughlin and Yantis find it; both metaphysically and geographically.

Tilth - Angular Music [Soft Abuse; 2012]

The rolling entrance of Angular Music, the proper debut from Nathan McLaughlin/Cody Yantis duo Tilth, is the fog hovering above the sound, the snow capping Rainier  the Columbia cutting the land in two. It’s the beauty of nature carefully captured in glass. A calculating, spatial composition that feels like the freeze and the thaw—and that’s just the awe of “Godfather.”

The mountain vistas and valley tunes of “For Sean” (a nod to the album’s master and oft mentioned AA fixture, Sean McCann) or the droll revelation of “Drisk” mount a wondrous A-side campaign. Yantis’ fragile guitar work pairs with McLaughlin’s curated sounds to evoke a palette of emotions from a host of similar ideas.

Don’t mistake similar to mean the same. The slow compositions each use a different timbre. “Drisk” is cold and dark, Yantis’ guitar rumbling from the belly of a glacial storm. “First Breath” is minimal nostalgia; though it conjures the childlike remembrance of seeing our breath on the first snow day, it does not out of a need to tap into such emotions to be relevant; it’s just the nature of the tone. “De la Serna” may recall Loren Connor or the simpler moments of the Jeweled Antler Collective but it does not owe either penitence.

Angular Music is the album to balance out the emotions of the day. Its even-keeled approach does not waver even as its disposition does. It is a journey to the center and McLaughlin and Yantis find it; both metaphysically and geographically.

Notes:

  1. jbsportfolio posted this

About:

Justin Spicer is a pop culture critic, writer and editor. He manages Tiny Mix Tapes' Cerberus section. He has written columns for KEXP, Ad Hoc, Impose, and SSG Music. His work has been published by The Village Voice, Brainwashed, and extinct websites and print publications across the globe. This website is a collection of many of Justin's articles, reviews, and features. You can contact him via the links in the side menu or ignore all of this completely.

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